3i Infotech Papers: Sample Questions 181 - 182 of 1245

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Question number: 181

» Languages » C & C Plus Plus

Essay Question▾

Describe in Detail

  1. void main ()
  2. {
  3.     char * s = “12345s ”;
  4.     printf ( “%d”, sizeof (s) );
  5. }

Explanation

  • In the progam

Table showing the program

Table showing the program

char * s = “12345s ”;

  • Define the character pointer s and its value

printf (“%d”, sizeof (s) );

  • Printf prints the size of s in bytes, remember s is the pointer

  • For a 32 bit computer, the pointer size is 4 bytes

  • 64 bit computers have 8 byte pointer size, however, a 64bit computer running a 32bit OS will have 4 byte pointer.

  • Thus, under a specific architecture, all types of pointers (void*, int*, char*, long * etc) will have same size (except function pointers).

Question number: 182

» Basic CS » Data Structures

Essay Question▾

Describe in Detail

What is your favourite sorting algorithm? Why?

Explanation

A bubble sort example

A Bubble Sort Example

A bubble sort example

  • Bubble sort is a good simple algorithm.

  • Not suitable for large data sets as its average and worst-case complexity are of where n is the number of items.

  • Beautiful algorithm easy to visualize with sorted elements bubbling up.

Bubble sort:

  • Let’s solve unsorted array:

Image of the sorting algorithm 1

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 1

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • 1st Iteration:

  • Start with two elements, comparing them to check which one is greater.

Image of the sorting algorithm 2

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 2

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • Value 33 is greater than 14

  • Therefore, they are in sorted locations.

  • We compare 33 with 27.

Image of the sorting algorithm 3

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 3

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • New array looks like

Image of the sorting algorithm 4

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 4

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • Compare 33 and 35.

  • Both are in sorted positions.

Image of the sorting algorithm 5

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 5

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • The next two values, 35 and 10

Image of the sorting algorithm 6

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 6

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • 10 is smaller then 35 and hence are not sorted.

Image of the sorting algorithm 7

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 7

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • Swap values.

  • We find that we reached the end of the array.

Image of the sorting algorithm 8

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 8

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • We are showing how an array should looks like each iteration. One iteration brought 35 to its correct location it bubbled to the top

  • After the second iteration.

Image of the sorting algorithm 9

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 9

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • After each iteration, one value moves to correct position.

Image of the sorting algorithm 10

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 10

Image of the sorting algorithm

  • When no swap is required, bubble sort learns that array is completely sorted.

Image of the sorting algorithm 11

Image of the Sorting Algorithm 11

Image of the sorting algorithm