Basic CS [TCS Placement]: Sample Questions 173 - 175 of 196

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Question 173

Basic CS
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Describe in Detail

Essay▾

Difference between bit rate and baud rate

Explanation

Difference between Bit Rate and Baud Rate
Bit rateBaud rate
Number of bits transmitted during one secondNumber of signal units per second that are required to represent the bit send in one second.
Determines the number of bits traveled per second.Determines how many times the state of a signal is changing.
Emphasis is on computer efficiency.Data transmission over the channel is primary concerned.
Cannot determine the bandwidth.Can determine how much bandwidth is required to send the signal.
Baud rate =

Question 174

Basic CS
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Describe in Detail

Essay▾

What is point-to-point link?

Explanation

  • Physical links limited to a pair of nodes are called point-to-point links.
  • Point to point networks connect one location to other location.
Given the Image is Define the Point to Point Link

Question 175

Basic CS
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Describe in Detail

Essay▾

Explain covariance and contra-variance in . NET Framework 4.0 give an example for each.

Explanation

  • In . NET 4.0, CLR supports covariance and contravariance of types in generic interfaces and delegates.
  • Covariance enables casting a generic type to its base types, that is, instance of type IEnumerable < Tl > can be assigned to a variable of type IEnumerable < T2 > where, T1 derives from T2.
  • For example,

IEnumerable < tring > str1 = new List < tring > () ;

IEnumerable < object > str2 = str1;

  • Contravariance allows assignment of variable of Action < base > to a variable of type Action < derived > .
  • For example,

IComparer < object > obj1 = GetComparer ()

IComparer < tring > obj2 = obj1;

  • . NET framework 4.0 uses Out keyword for covariance, while “in” is used for contra-variance.
  • Variance can be applied only to reference types, generic interfaces, and generic delegates and not to value types and generic types.

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